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Veronica’s Review of ‘Love, Desire and Betrayal’

7 Oct

A big ‘Thank you’ to Veronica for her 5 star review of ‘Love, Desire and Betrayal’.

In part, she writes:

‘Margaret Lynette Sharp’s writing is poetic and descriptive. The stories realistically depicted the heady feeling of falling in love and how circumstances and distance can put a strain on  a relationship.’

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1069800661?book_show_action=true&page=1

This title is currently available on Amazon Kindle. I am hoping that, in the not too distant future, a paperback version will be issued.

 

Stop Press: ‘A Taste…’ is On Special!

27 Apr

Like romantic vignettes?

Love a bargain?

Then, here’s your chance!

For just one week, my second title, ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’ is half price (or less) on Kindle.

Lots of reviews, many five stars!

Here’s the link http://www.amazon.com/Taste-Life-Love-Australia-ebook/dp/B008FOEG12/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

Just U.S. $1.49

A New Review for My First Title

19 Sep

Today started  delightfully. Not only was the sunshine streaming in through the windows, I also discovered a beautifully-crafted review of my first title, ’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’ had been posted.

Particularly interesting to me was its perception of this book through the eyes of someone living outside of Australia.

A big thank you, Jake!

Here it is:

25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia
by Margaret Lynette Sharp (Goodreads Author)

22197862

Jake Taylor‘s review

Sep 18, 13
Read in September, 2013
Some years ago, the wife of a dear friend of mine told me to grab a few sweets available to all the guests at the end of a lovely dinner. Having chosen the wrong ones, she corrected me by saying, “Not those ones, the other ones, the small dark-chocolate ones.” I picked up a few of these and they proved to be absolutely delicious morsels. That’s what these twenty-five stories reminded me of. Small bits of wonderment that do not quite tell you the end; they rather let you imagine it and savor it in your own mind. “25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia” also provide the reader, especially the ones that are not Aussies, with some unique expressions and references common to that lovely land, for example, “cuppa” for a cup of tea, and kookaburra, which is a kind of bird. You will get all the flavor of the land down under, Ms Sharp makes sure of that.
In addition, she includes many funny statements, like the one pronounced by a wife when referring to her stage fright while playing the piano in front of an audience. She decided to practice a couple of tunes for quite some time until she could say that: “They didn’t sound too bad, either, when my audience consisted exclusively of my husband and our dog.”
Well, I hope you pick up a copy of this book and enjoy its 25 short stories while drinking a nice cuppa. It is fun to read; five stars. Jake Taylor

Mark’s Review: Amelia’s Call

25 Jun

My thanks to Goodreads reviewer Mark for providing this review of my first novella, ‘Amelia’s Call’.

http://www.amazon.com/Amelias-Call-ebook/dp/B00DLYLK4M/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_t

 

Amelia’s Call
by Margaret Lynette Sharp (Goodreads Author)
9800512

Mark‘s review

Jun 25, 13

bookshelves: novella

 

This is a powerful, page-turning, first-person narrative about naïveté and denial, disabuse and empowerment and the changing perception of the meaning of marriage — and the “motive and the cue” for relationships. Sharp offers a multi-faceted perspective that will appeal both to social liberals and feminists who cannot abide the presumption of patriarchal dominance (which would include this reviewer), and those to whom the sanctity of a commitment is still important (which would also include this reviewer). None of her characters is flat or unidimensional, though. Some are strong, confident and well-intentioned, but not controlling. Others are weak and insecure, but not malevolent. Only the mother-in-law comes across as manipulative and loathsome, but her plight, too, is human and comprehensible. There is neither absolutism of fidelity nor wholly unmotivated cheating, but in husband and wife both, some impulse to develop into the people they fundamentally are, but have been derailed from becoming. For the husband, we might think, this is the sadder outcome. However one takes it, the conclusion is satisfying. No unhappy endings. Five stars.