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’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’ now on Kindle

29 Jun

At last, we’ve caught up with technology and published with Kindle!

My first book, 25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008FP217C: is now available.

There’s a diverse range of stories and vignettes, such as ‘Family Values’ ( a tale about a family visiting their folks in the country); ‘New Digs’ (about an elderly lady changing her address); ‘Fresh Pickings’ ( a tale of young love and expectations); ‘The Virgin Dancer’ ( discovering dancing in middle age) and ‘A Question of Trust’ ( a new relationship in trouble).

Many readers have told me that they liked it very much, and some have purchased extra copies as gifts.

If you like Short Stories, particularly those written by Australian women writers, then I suggest you investigate this volume.

‘A Song for Ellie’ : from ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’

3 Jun

 

‘Did she notice me in the crowd?  Was I just another face, beaming my approval, my adulation?  Or was her smile, in my direction,  truly meant for me?’

 

Thus begins ‘A Song for Ellie’, one of the twenty-eight stories in ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’: my one and only book to receive a professional review by Australian writer Jenny Schwartz. To say the truth: my one and only book to be seriously appraised.

 

‘A Song for Ellie’ tells the story of a smitten, genuine young man who uses his initiative in an attempt at wooing a young, naive singer. It’s one of my favourite stories in the ‘Life and Love’ series.

 

I don’t know what Jenny thought of it: she didn’t specify any particular likes: but I’m delighted to say she seems to have strongly approved of the book in its entirety. She rated it 5 Stars!

 

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‘Long and Short Australian Stories’ is Here!

17 Apr

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Our sixth volume of Short Stories, entitled ‘Long and Short Australian Stories’, is set to find its way onto bookshelves. Written by myself, Margaret Lynette Sharp, like all the others, this book is edited by my husband  Ronald Sharp B.E.M., the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

Set in contemporary Australia, this volume differs from the other collections of Short Stories that I have written in a couple of ways.

The first thing you’ll notice is the difference in setting out, which is aimed at making the stories even easier to read.

The second difference lies in the length and structure of the first and last stories. Each is relatively lengthy, and spans a number of years, giving greater depth to the tales.

The third difference  is that there is no link between the first and last stories: the signature of the ‘Life and Love in Australia’ series.  However, I’m hoping the quality of the work makes up for any disappointment by readers on this score.

As an Australian author, I’m proud to say that this book is listed by the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2012, and is also mentioned on the ‘Friends of the National Year of reading 2012’ page.

Just released on April 11 this year, why not be amongst the first in the world to discover this new addition to Australian contemporary literature?

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Published Today: ‘Long and Short Australian Stories’

11 Apr

We’ve done it again; unleashed our new baby into the literary world. ‘Long and Short Australian Stories’ has been released.

This being our sixth effort, I guess we’re beginning to feel like old hands at it, yet I’d be lying if I said the thrill is diminishing. There it is, a real book, for better or for worse: the culmination of thought, education, effort, emotion and life experience.

‘Long and Short Australian Stories’ differs a little from our set of four volumes of ‘Life and Love in Australia’ by virtue of its relatively  lengthy, unrelated, first and last stories.

In addition, I feel that it is overall a little more serious than the earlier collections. Whether this is a plus or a minus, I don’t quite know.

Written by myself, and edited by my husband Ronald Sharp B.E.M., this volume is a true family effort, since my husband’s daughter Sandra  also helped in the setting-up for publication.

Quite by accident, it’s been released on the hundredth anniversary of the departure of the ill-fated Titanic.  I can only hope that it, too, isn’t destined for disaster.

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My Book and Me: At a Library

9 Jan

Margaret with her third book of Australian Short Stories

Whether mundane or exhilarating, life’s events come and go. Not surprisingly, first-time experiences seem to linger in our memory, especially those with happy associations.

As I stood today in a local library, gazing at my third book, ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia’, on display amidst a wealth of literature, I felt the strangest sense of amazement.

A mere eighteen months ago, the idea of having a book published seemed almost ethereal. Sure, I’d studied writing, way back when I was in my twenties and thirties. And yes, our local paper consistently published my letters. But books were something else, something permanent, almost reverent.

So, looking back, if anyone had said that, by now, I’d have five volumes in print, and that most of these would have found their way onto library shelves, I’d have scoffed incredulously. And yet, that’s exactly what’s happened.

The moral?

You never know what you can do, unless you try!

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Australian Short Stories: My Way

27 Oct

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What pops into your mind when someone says ‘Australian Short Stories’?

Do you think of the outback: tales of bush-men boiling a billy on a camp-fires? Kelpies and cattle dogs earning their keep by rounding up herds of sheep or cattle? Agricultural scenes: the rugged lifestyle of being a wheat or sugar cane grower?

If these are typical of the depictions you expect to see in my Short Story Collections, you’ll be in for a surprise.

My ‘Life and Love in Australia’ series of four volumes is dominated by tales of romance. Whether set in city or country, they feature a diverse selection of  characters, plots and motivations.

You’ll find music-lovers, party-goers and dancers, as well as quiet, older folk, sometimes  finding romance when they least expect it. You’ll also discover tales of human interest, such as parents’ concerns over their children’s lives, or something quite different like a humorous account of musical performance gone awry.

So, next time you hear the words ‘Australian Short Stories’, why not think of those of Margaret Lynette Sharp?

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Review: Reflections of Life and Love in Australia

19 Oct

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Looking for a brand new collection of modern Short Stories, set in Australia? Then this is for you!

Just weeks after publication, very few know about it yet. What an opportunity to impress your circle with this discovery!

The fourth in the series, ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’ encompasses a selection of twenty-five new stories, mainly of love and romance yet interspersed with human interest tales. Averaging around four or five pages, they’re written to appeal to a wide audience.

Tales of love, from the awakening passions of youth to the special bonds of maturity, are easy to relate to and understand. From ‘Letting Her Go’: a mother’s account of her fears as her only child races towards womanhood, through to ‘Into the Sunshine’: a tale of love in senior years, there’s a wealth of stories that trace defining moments.

Human interest stories such as ‘Hand in Hand’, which highlights parents’ dilemma of sport versus music studies, and ‘A Secret, Banished’, relating a grandmother’s impetus to improve her reading, provide a touch of contrast.

As always, this collection has been edited by my husband Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Sydney Opera House.

Interested? Then, please check out the Amazon web-site of ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’, and use the ‘look inside’ feature to whet your appetite. And then, if you’re impressed, please tell your friends!

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