Tag Archives: Australian female author

Review: The Essence of Life and Love in Australia

18 Oct

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This, the third in my ‘life and love’ series, follows in a similar vein to its predecessors in that it’s easy, light yet reflective, and since each short story is quick to digest, ideal for time-poor readers.

Take, for example, ‘Language of Love’. Warren, a young, naive guy with a penchant for putting his foot in his mouth, has fallen for Linda, a gorgeous, sophisticated French-language student. His task is to attract her attention, and get into her good graces. Can he succeed?

Another stand-out story is ‘My Daughter, Sally.’ Written from the point of view of the father, this relates episodes whereby a very young woman encounters some harsh realities of life and love.

Readers may also relate to ‘At Seventeen’, another scenario. Is it love or infatuation that Marianne feels?

If you’re looking for a fresh book of modern, Australian Short Stories that’s suitable for those of diverse ages and backgrounds, and like to recognise and encourage new writers, why not take a look at ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia’?  Edited by my husband  Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House, it’s available through Amazon.com.

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Review: A Taste of Life and Love in Australia

17 Oct

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Is your favourite theme love and romance? Do you have just minutes to while away? Do you like real page turners?

If you answered yes to the above, or even if you didn’t, why not consider ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’?

Averaging just four pages each. this volume contains some of my all-time favourites, starting with the first story.

‘The Girl Next Door’ relates a very young man’s struggle to make a first date with the girl of his dreams. Written from the male point of view, it aims to engage  interest from the beginning since Allen, the hero, is sketched as a rather shy but likeable guy: the sort of person for whom you’d go in to bat. Sadly,perhaps, the outcome is not a happy one. But readers, don’t despair! The story is taken up again in ‘A Second Chance’, at book’s end.

Another stand-out story, and Ron’s particular favourite, is ‘A Song For Ellie’, again written from the male point of view. In desperation, a young man resolves to write a song: not just any old song, but a touching, inspiring one, to give to a lovely young singer whom he idolises. How does he fare?

How have people responded to this book? One female reader of mature years tells me she “loves the first story”. Another says she’d often pick it up, intending to read only one tale, and go on to several!

Interested? Then, why not investigate the Amazon web-page which features ‘Look Inside’. If you’re impressed, please spread the word.

Thanks.

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