Tag Archives: Australian woman writer

Reminiscing….

12 Jul

Do you reminisce?

Do you look back on milestones: consider your life before and after THE EVENT?

I guess all of us, if we survive into middle age, can look back and pinpoint the decisions that have moulded our lives. It could be anything: from personal involvements, trips, or choice of career.

One of my most recent big moments came almost two years ago. I decided to write a book.

I think this idea came into being around the time of the wedding of a close relation.  Of course, I saw this a milestone in her life: a decision, a turning point, for the future. She would have this to look back on.

I suppose I then considered that I, too, wanted a milestone. Already happily married, it had to be something else. A career!

And realistically, the only career that held prospects of satisfaction for myself was as a writer. I had the background: successful completion of literary courses, followed by extensive reading and life observation.

So, egged on by my husband, and later editor, Ronald Sharp B.E.M., I started to write a book. A book of Short Stories, set in the Australia that I love. A book that spoke to others of the joys and vicissitudes of life and humanity: that could make you laugh, or maybe shed a tear or two of happiness. That book, a collection of Short Stories, became known as ’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’. It gave me my first taste of the pleasure of receiving a five star review; a pleasure which was not repeated for many months, since getting the work into the wider literary community is, unfortunately, a slow and difficult process.

At last, I’m making progress. Six books published, and it’s just starting to happen! Exciting times!

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http://www.amazon.com/25-Stories-Life-Love-Australia/dp/1456597736

’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’ now on Kindle

29 Jun

At last, we’ve caught up with technology and published with Kindle!

My first book, 25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008FP217C: is now available.

There’s a diverse range of stories and vignettes, such as ‘Family Values’ ( a tale about a family visiting their folks in the country); ‘New Digs’ (about an elderly lady changing her address); ‘Fresh Pickings’ ( a tale of young love and expectations); ‘The Virgin Dancer’ ( discovering dancing in middle age) and ‘A Question of Trust’ ( a new relationship in trouble).

Many readers have told me that they liked it very much, and some have purchased extra copies as gifts.

If you like Short Stories, particularly those written by Australian women writers, then I suggest you investigate this volume.

Review: Mary Poppins Comes Back

31 Mar

The second in the series, ‘Mary Poppins Comes Back’ weaves the special magic created by the brilliantly inventive Australian female writer P.L.Travers.

Although first published in the mid 1930’s, it’s stood the test of time, partly due to its language use, partly due to its timeless appeal to our imagination, and partly due to the cinematic and stage revival of Mary Poppins as an iconic figure.

As in other volumes, Mary Poppins arrives (and leaves) in magical circumstances; and, as always, the intervening period is full of magical happenings denied as reality by Mary Poppins herself.

My favourite story from this book concerns the unwanted arrival of Mister Banks’ childhood Governess, Miss Euphemia Andrew, who proves herself to be every bit the ‘Holy Terror’ whom he had earlier described. This provides Mary Poppins with an ideal opportunity to display not only her abundance of bravery, but also her kindness and sense of decency by releasing the lark that the formidable, terrifying Miss Andrew had herself trapped and caged for the preceding two years. Justice is served when Miss Andrew finds herself captured in the tiny cage, and carried off by the lark. On her return, she is forced to humble herself to Mary Poppins, and leaves the family to rejoice at her exit.

Despite her sternness and conceit, Mary Poppins remains an endearing character, a ‘treasure’, to the Banks’ family, and the household always sorely laments her departure.

Some people seem to think that the first volume, ‘Mary Poppins’, is superior: nevertheless ‘Mary Poppins Comes Back’ is,  and remains, a remarkable children’s classic.

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