Tag Archives: Grand Organ

Thanks, Amazon.com!

30 Sep

Congratulations to Amazon.com for their refreshingly slick delivery of web-sites for my brand new collection of modern Australian Short stories, ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’.

What a morale-boost!

With the four volumes completed, I’ve written a total of one hundred and six, easy to read short stories: mostly romances, sure, but all woven differently.  My favourites in ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’ include ‘At The Art Society Picnic’, ‘Wishing’, ‘Letting Her Go’, and ‘Into the Sunshine’.

Not into Short Stories?  Then perhaps you’ll like my next book. Something quite different: yet, like the rest, edited by my husband  Ronald Sharp B.E.M., the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

I’ll keep you posted!

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It’d Never Have Happened, Without Ron

28 Sep

As I put the finishing touches on my fifth book, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the immense help, support and time that my husband Ronald Sharp B.E.M. has given me.

From the very beginning, Story One Book One, right through to the final pages of this, my fifth book, Ron has been involved. Not just with praise and enthusiasm for my writing, although he has been more than liberal with that. No: he has spend much time and effort in the editing, compilation, and setting up of the books. The resulting work mirrors his high standards of excellence in presentation; the same excellence that is evident in his Pipe-Organs.

If you ever hold a copy of any of these books in your hand, please remember the effort made by my husband, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House, in bringing them into being.

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What Day Would I Like to Relive?

24 Sep

What day would YOU like to relive? My guess is, it’s a day of unbridled happiness; a day when your dreams came true.

Same for me. It’s my wedding day! The day I married my husband, Ronald Sharp B.E.M., the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

It was a quiet, family do at a close relative’s home. My bridesmaids wore pink, and I wore white.  Not a traditional gown: that would have seemed a bit out of place, I thought, since simplicity was the key-note.

I was given away by a senior family member, who, later on, performed this role for my niece.  I needed someone to walk with me up the pathway, for I confess to being very nervous and self-conscious despite being in the company of loved ones.

Somehow, I got the words out, and so did Ron. More formalities followed, and then we had our little party, surrounded by friendly faces. But like so many good things, it ended too soon, which makes it my choice as the day to re-live.

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Can We Do Without Cans?

22 Aug

The first time ever I went shopping at the supermarket with my husband Ron, he was less than appreciative of the fact that I bought food in cans.

“What a waste of metal!” he muttered. “They should be made into organ pipes!”

He should know, as the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

Nevertheless, my only response was to promise to recycle. How could I live without cans?

With difficulty, I hear you say. After all, so much of what we eat and enjoy is available, (almost)ready to eat, at a reasonable price. Remove cans from my shopping list, and everything from apricots (in juice or syrup) to zucchini is off the  menu. Well, unless you wish to go to the effort of preparing it all yourself; not to mention the problems of keeping fresh food fresh, instead of stored out of the way, in a kitchen cupboard.

Doubtless, great great great Grandma managed just fine without them, but then, she didn’t have the other pressures of life as we know it to contend with!

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Ron Loves Book Four

20 Aug

How’s this for a vote of confidence?

Ronald Sharp B.E.M., my husband, collaborator, and the creator of the Grand Organ in the Sydney Opera House, was sitting at the computer this morning, reviewing and spacing the words of my next collection of  Short Stories.

“You’re great, darl! ” he calls out. “How do you do it? You haven’t experienced this, and yet you’ve got it down so perfectly!”

Be that as it may, writers who aspire to engage with their readers on a realistic level need to possess one quality: empathy.  It seems to me that , following on from empathy, your imagination can take over and create a convincing response; the crux of good, believable writing.

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About Margaret Lynette Sharp

15 Aug

Hi again,

This is to tell my readers something about me and my life.

I am very happily married to Ronald Sharp B.E.M., best known as the builder of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House. Since we are both creative people, we encourage and support each other in our projects. Certainly, without his enthusiasm for my writing, I would not have reached the stage of having three volumes of Australian Short Stories published, and available from Amazon.com; and the fourth book nearly there.

We live in a quiet Sydney suburb, in a rather small, old brick house, surrounded by things that interest us. Ron and I both play the piano, and we both like the same type of music, mostly Schubert, Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin. Twice a month we go rock and roll dancing, which is a lot of fun.

I have been involved with the local amateur swimming club for decades as a competitor, and have finished in dozens of one kilometre events. The last season, I swam in every freestyle event, which helped me to win the ladies point-score by the narrowest of margins. I guess that goes to show that perseverance can overcome deficiencies in ability.

I love the beach, and try to go there at least once a week, all year round. It’s just so beautiful, even when swimming is out of the question due to low water temperature.

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My First Post

15 Jul

Hi, let me introduce myself. My name is Margaret Lynette Sharp, and I’m a life-long resident of Sydney, Australia.

My husband, Ronald Sharp, and I are collaborating in the production of a series of modern Australian Short Stories, three of which have already been released. They are ’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’. ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’, and, just out, ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia.’

At 81, Ron has demonstrated that his love of innovation isn’t confined to organ-building. World-renowned as the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House, he has stamped his mark on these books by using his special system of word-spacing, which he says is inspired by breathing spaces in singing. Not only does this add to the ease of reading, he believes, it also contributes to the atmosphere and clarity. “It’s so real,” says Ron.”You feel as though you’re there. It makes you wish you were young again.”

I decided to write books of Short Stories in early Spring, 2010, after seeing a large amount of my Letters to the Editor of Sydney newspapers in print. I’d studied Short Story Writing  for four years, and Freelance Journalism for one year, when I was in my late twenties and early thirties, but didn’t pursue it due to family circumstances. However, when Ron encouraged me to give writing another go, I took little convincing.

Those who have commented on my stories emphasize their ease of reading, enthralling nature, and suitability for a wide range of age-groups. My readers have aged between mid-twenties and early nineties, and have come from walks of life as varied as medical practitioners to retirees.

Romance dominates my stories.  Some are quite light and semi-humorous, others are deep, even introspective. The average length is just four pages, making them ideal for time-poor readers. They could be a good choice for people who want a gentle introduction to books, since they are not too challenging to understand.

They are available through Amazon.com. Their list price is U.S.$15.95 each.

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