Tag Archives: Life and Love

Boomer Lit: Here’s Some More….

18 Jul

I am delighted by the response to my recent post that featured a short extract of Boomer Lit, taken from my title ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia’. Thanks to all those who left comments!

This time, I’ve chosen a sample from my second title, the well-reviewed ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’. I’m proud to say that this book has been accepted by the Awesome Indies Group, which has standards of admission equal to those of traditionally-published titles.

Enough of that. Let’s get down to the business of whetting one’s appetite.

LUCK OF THE DRAW

She strolled along the promenade, enjoying the hint of coolness in the mid-summer breeze. It was late afternoon. She’d spent an hour or two walking on the sands, pausing now and then to study the activities in the shimmering rock-pools scattered here and there. How she loved the roar of the ocean, and the delicious saltiness of the abundant sea-spray. It had been a favourite haunt of Tom and herself, twenty or more years ago.

She recalled the day he’d proposed to her, right there, by the sea. Her girlish hopes were realized when he produced that simple solitaire diamond ring. Overjoyed, she’d accepted , and they’d sealed their love with a kiss, and the promise of more. But their joy was short lived. Tom was killed in a car accident, before their wedding had taken place.

Absent-mindedly, she felt for her ring.

She was assailed by panic.

*            *            *            *           *           *             *             *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *            *

Are you enjoying this? It’s one of twenty-eight vignettes in ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’. In it you’ll find characters in a wide range of ages and situations. It’s available through Amazon in Kindle and paperback.

http://www.amazon.com/Taste-Life-Love-Australia-ebook/dp/B008FOEG12

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My 200th Post: What I Love About Self Publishing

1 Oct

Certainly it has its critics, but as one who has been there and done it, I for one can vouch for its virtues.

In the old days, self publishing’s image was often tarnished by the dreaded ‘vanity press’ tag. Undeniably, those self-published works have not been scrutinized by publishers, whom one might suppose chose the best and rejected the rest. Were this universally true, it would be hard then to fathom the reasoning behind self publishing by such immortals as Jane Austen, James Joyce, Rudyard Kipling and George Bernard Shaw. Sure, anyone can self publish; and, if we believe the critics, there are plenty of books out there that are nothing more than uninspiring collections of words. On the other hand, if we are to believe the reviewers, more than a handful of gems exist.

The beauty of self publishing lies in the degree of control it offers. It’s all in the hands of the creator(s). From original text, to editing, layout, cover, and promotion: it’s all a hands-on experience. There is no need to please the publisher: you need aim only to please whom you choose to please. Could be your readers, your family, or just yourself: it all depends on you.

The other attraction is the speed of results. No longer do you have to wait, perhaps for years, to see your work in print. It’s there: in e-book or physical. Moreover, it’s available for as long (or as little) as you choose. Particularly amongst new authors, it can take a while to get established, and develop a fan base. Conventional publishing may see your book withdrawn from sale too soon.

As a veteran of six self published books:25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia, A Taste of Life and Love in Australia, The Essence of Life and Love in Australia, Reflections of Life and Love in Australia, 60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences, and Long and Short Australian Stories, I can vouch for the advantages of going down the self-published path, and hold my head high as I remember the company I am in.

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You Can’t Judge a Book by it’s Cover: Or Can You?

3 Nov

You can’t judge a book by it’s cover. Or so I’ve heard, many, many times.

Sure, you can’t get an indication of the quality of the writing, yet can’t certain other characteristics be more than hinted at?

Take my four-volume collection of Short Stories, each with the common end- name of ‘Life and Love’.  Each cover features a scene photographed in Sydney by my husband, the organ-builder Ronald Sharp, set against a white background. The printed words are plain and clear. Does this suggest to you an honest, decent, intelligent read?

Likewise, our newest venture, 60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences. Again, the same unadorned printing on a simple white background surrounds a photo of a woman sitting, thinking, in a garden of flowers. A selection of topics contained within are noted in an aesthetically pleasing fashion. What do you make of this? An interesting, thought-provoking selection of articles? Something uncommon, different?

So many volumes by other authors have a feel quite different to mine, yet remarkably often of the same flavour as each other. What does that suggest? Popular, commercial images? Mass market strategy? A tried and true formula?

All in all, isn’t it true that, much like an individual’s face, a book cover can actually be a revelation?

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Who is Margaret Sharp?

19 Aug

As both a writer of ‘Letters to the Editor’ of my local paper, ‘The Leader’, and as an author of books, it may be confusing to my readers that I ‘m known as Margaret Sharp in the former, and Margaret Lynette Sharp in the latter.

One of my letters appeared in yesterday’s edition of my local Sydney suburban newspaper; a piece about public libraries. Formerly, the paper chose many of my letters that were aimed at saving a local historically significant building, a cause which, sadly, faced defeat.

Readers of ‘The Leader’ may be interested to see a few of my Short Stories. The main Amazon.com web site features  ‘Click here’, and that can get you to the first pages of each of my books. Please Google Margaret Lynette Sharp, and find a title in my ‘Life and Love’ series that appeals to you.

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About ‘Life and Love’

16 Aug

‘Life and Love’ is the common thread of titles and themes in my series of modern Australian Short Stories.

By ‘Life’, I mean human interest stories; tales that shed light on human nature, and document scenes and situations that people may find themselves in, without necessarily involving romance. My first book ,’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’, contains several of these, as does my fourth.

My ‘Love’ stories are, of course, romances. Mostly, they end happily, though, as in real life, sometimes they don’t; therefore, the outcomes aren’t totally predictable. The final stories of each volume are linked by characters to the first, and often resolve the unhappiness of a lover.

Many people have told me that they liked ’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’, but sadly few have had the time to publish this comment.

The ‘Amazon.com’ site features ‘Click here’, so that you can read at least the first story in each book.

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