Tag Archives: rainbow lorikeets

Something in Common

16 Mar
Noisy Miner

Noisy Miner

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

What do Noisy Miners and Rainbow Lorikeets have in common?

If we’re speaking gastronomically, here’s the answer. They both seem to love feasting on Banksia flowers.

Not so long ago I spotted these birds, each breakfasting on the same bush in our local park. They had splendid views to enjoy, too: they overlooked the river.

Enjoy!

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A Pair of Beauties

10 Mar
A Pair of Beauties: Rainbow Lorikeets

A Pair of Beauties: Rainbow Lorikeets

A pair of beauties.

How else to describe these wonderfully-feathered parrots…

Recently Lady Luck favoured me by giving me the means to capture this charming image.

Rainbow Lorikeets are such beautiful birds, and so well named.

They inhabit our local bushland park in southern Sydney. Sometimes they can also be seen in local gardens. In this situation, Grevilleas rank highly in their scale of  favourite plants.

Enjoy!

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Rainbow Lorikeets: Wonders of the Australian Bush

7 Feb
Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeets: so aptly named!

I know of no other wild Australian bird that sports a more vivid, striking and cheerful display of coloured feathers, not to mention a wonderfully cheeky red beak.

Flocks of these parrots inhabit our local park  and often visit neighbouring gardens, especially those that support Australian natives such as Grevilleas, Banksias  and Bottlebrush.

Delightful!

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Gum Trees and All…

22 Jan

I love to stroll around this track. There’s interest all around, from the river to the shrubs, from the sand to the sky. Who knows what I’ll spy?

Ducks, sea-gulls, even a pelican or two. Shags, herons, plovers, egrets and swallows all  find their way onto or around the water’s edge. Sure, except for the swallows, their numbers are small –even negligible –yet the promise of seeing their beauty is always there.

Both on the ground and overhead, Cockatoos, Rainbow Lorikeets, King Parrots, Magpies, Noisy Miners, Kookaburras and the occasional Blue Wren can be found.

Australian bushland holds many delights.

My favourite track

My favourite track

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It’s Time for a Rest….

25 Dec

It’s time for a rest….

I guess that’s what this pair of Rainbow Lorikeets have decided.

Their heads are turned in such a way as to expose their vivid and beautiful chest feathers.

So eye-catching!

Rainbow Lorikeets in Sydney

Rainbow Lorikeets in Sydney

Lovely Lorikeets!

6 Dec

Australia is blessed in having a diverse and extensive range of parrots.

In suburban Sydney where I live, Rainbow Lorikeets are often seen, especially in natural bushland and  gardens planted with native flora

Lovely Lorikeets

Lovely Lorikeets

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Recently I was especially lucky to capture a group shot as these colourful birds searched the ground for tidbits.

Enjoy!

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Where, Now?

29 Aug

Where, now?

That’s what this Rainbow Lorikeet seems to be thinking….

Certainly  it on the move, and luck came my way as I snapped it just in time!

The beauties of Australian nature are wondrous.

Where, now?

Where, now?

 

House Swapping, Parrot Style

21 Jul
Surveying the nest: Rainbow Lorikeets

Surveying the nest: Rainbow Lorikeets

2013_0718imagefacebook0273Do our native parrots covet others’ homes?

That’s the question I asked myself this morning when I saw what had happened.

For many weeks I’d watched the tireless diligence, the devoted effort, of a certain white cockatoo. Every day he’d be hard at work, chipping away. Every morning I’d see an impressive pile of wood-chips on the path below. Quite often, the lady of the house would come and inspect her partner’s progress, maybe give her opinion, and then fly off again.

And so it was with amazement that I witnessed today’s event. A small flock of Rainbow Lorikeets were eying up the nest, and apparently liking what they saw.

Have they decided to become squatters?

Who knows?

Flashing Jewels: Rainbow Lorikeets!

19 Oct

Rainbow Lorikeet in a tree

Two Rainbow Lorikeets in tree hollow

Australia is blessed by many delightful avian species. Parrots must surely rank as one of the most engaging.

As a child of the city, I never saw these lovely creatures in the wild. Despite the relief of an occasional park, the streets of concrete and bitumen were not conducive to their habitation.

And so, when later on we moved away: to an outer suburb closer to bushland: these often brilliantly coloured birds formed a part of my journey of discovery.

While sometimes they visit local front gardens: particularly those with native plants: they are often to be seen in bushland parks.

One of the most common in number, though not in beauty, is the Rainbow Lorikeet. As its name suggests, it’s a gloriously multi-coloured bird. Small wonder  it was the first Australian parrot illustrated in colour: in Peter Brown’s 1774 publication: New Illustrations of Zoology.

Primarily blossom feeders, these gregarious creatures fly in flocks: some very small, others of many dozens. Interestingly, they do not glide. Their calls change according to their activity: from screeching, right through to soft twitters.

As I stroll through bushland, my eyes constantly search for beautiful things: birds, flowers, even leaves.  Am I not lucky to be rewarded so wonderfully?

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