Tag Archives: Ronald Sharp

What Music did you Grow Up With?

24 Nov

Thinking back to your early life, what music do you remember with affection?

I must have been born under a lucky star, for I was born in the mid 1950’s, and therefore grew up listening to some of the greatest, most enduring modern music.

Through the magic of the internet, I’ve just watched and listened to some of my all-time favourites. ‘Love is in the Air’, ‘The Carnival is Over’, ‘Pretty Woman’, ‘There’s a Kind of Hush’, ‘A World of Our Own’ to name just a few.

My husband Ronald Sharp the Sydney Opera House Organ builder tells me he’s only lately discovered some of these tunes, and loves them too. As a devotee of classical music, Ron’s glowing endorsement of these masterpieces of post 1950 reinforces my elevated opinion.

Our joy in this spills over to following an excellent, local band which performs these in an inspiring manner. Who can resist dancing, either on the floor or in spirit?

Can one overestimate the power and magic of music?

Australian Author Margaret Lynette Sharp: Which Book Am I Proud Of?

26 Oct

As an Australian author with a total of five books published, I’ve been asked this question.  Which of your books are you most proud?

This is a tough one.  It’s akin to asking, “Which is your favourite child?”

I guess you could liken my first four to quadruplets, since they’re four of a kind. Even their names are closely linked.  ’25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia’, ‘A Taste of Life and Love in Australia’, ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia’, and, you guessed it, ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia.’  These volumes are dominated by romances, though some are interspersed with tales of human interest.  They’re quite short, averaging just four or five pages, flowing,and easy to comprehend.

My latest creation, ’60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences’ is currently an ‘only child’, of sorts.  Will it remain so?  Who knows?

All five volumes are edited by my husband, Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Sydney Opera House.  His creative influence has touched all these books through his innovative style.

Back to the question.

I’m proud of them all, since within each there are stand-out favourites that show my own characteristic style to best advantage.

But, if pressed for an answer, I’ ll say the last.

Why?

Because ’60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences’ makes me smile!

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Off to a Good Start!

21 Oct

’60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences’ has done what none of my previous books has achieved: a ranking in the top 300,000’s of the Amazon best sellers list, within a few days of its appearance!

A complete break with its predecessors, ’60 Questions….’ must surely rate as the easiest of all to read. The setting out, language, and diversity of topics all contribute to its being a real page-turner, especially for those who relish lateral thinking combined with reality.

As always, this volume has been edited by my husband, Ronald Sharp, the builder of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

Will its newest readers be so impressed they’ll tell their friends?

As author, I can only hope.

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Review: Reflections of Life and Love in Australia

19 Oct

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Looking for a brand new collection of modern Short Stories, set in Australia? Then this is for you!

Just weeks after publication, very few know about it yet. What an opportunity to impress your circle with this discovery!

The fourth in the series, ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’ encompasses a selection of twenty-five new stories, mainly of love and romance yet interspersed with human interest tales. Averaging around four or five pages, they’re written to appeal to a wide audience.

Tales of love, from the awakening passions of youth to the special bonds of maturity, are easy to relate to and understand. From ‘Letting Her Go’: a mother’s account of her fears as her only child races towards womanhood, through to ‘Into the Sunshine’: a tale of love in senior years, there’s a wealth of stories that trace defining moments.

Human interest stories such as ‘Hand in Hand’, which highlights parents’ dilemma of sport versus music studies, and ‘A Secret, Banished’, relating a grandmother’s impetus to improve her reading, provide a touch of contrast.

As always, this collection has been edited by my husband Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Sydney Opera House.

Interested? Then, please check out the Amazon web-site of ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’, and use the ‘look inside’ feature to whet your appetite. And then, if you’re impressed, please tell your friends!

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Need a Break? Read a Story!

18 Oct

When the doctor’s not on time, when the housework’s getting you down, when boredom’s setting in: why not read a story?

Short Stories have a lot going for them: they’re quick to read and can involve you in life outside your own immediate sphere. What better way to refresh your mind than to get involved in another’ s fortunes?

Like the idea? Willing and ready to discover a new, female author? Tell your friends: who knows,  maybe you’ll be instrumental in propelling my work to star status.

Interested? Then please read on.

My recently published four volumes of easy to read stories are all set in Australia, and I’d love you to sample them. Just Google Margaret Lynette Sharp, Amazon.com and, with luck you’ll come across the web-sites that feature ‘look inside’.

These books have all been edited by my husband Ronald Sharp, whose skill and innovation as the builder of the Grand Organ in The Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House is world renowned.

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Review: The Essence of Life and Love in Australia

18 Oct

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This, the third in my ‘life and love’ series, follows in a similar vein to its predecessors in that it’s easy, light yet reflective, and since each short story is quick to digest, ideal for time-poor readers.

Take, for example, ‘Language of Love’. Warren, a young, naive guy with a penchant for putting his foot in his mouth, has fallen for Linda, a gorgeous, sophisticated French-language student. His task is to attract her attention, and get into her good graces. Can he succeed?

Another stand-out story is ‘My Daughter, Sally.’ Written from the point of view of the father, this relates episodes whereby a very young woman encounters some harsh realities of life and love.

Readers may also relate to ‘At Seventeen’, another scenario. Is it love or infatuation that Marianne feels?

If you’re looking for a fresh book of modern, Australian Short Stories that’s suitable for those of diverse ages and backgrounds, and like to recognise and encourage new writers, why not take a look at ‘The Essence of Life and Love in Australia’?  Edited by my husband  Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House, it’s available through Amazon.com.

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Review: 25 Stories of Life and Love in Australia

17 Oct

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I suppose a book review written by its author is apt to attract a very healthy degree of scepticism, yet who knows its contents more intimately?

If you haven’t already rejected my thoughts as useless, I promise to faithfully deliver the comments of others, as well as my own.

To begin, let me say that  ’25 Stories…’ is my first book, started in September 2010 and published early this year. It’s been edited by my husband, Ronald Sharp, the creator of the Grand Organ in the Sydney Opera House, and his enthusiasm was instrumental in bringing this, and all my books, about.

One reader described it on its Amazon site as “hard to put down”; further, his wife and himself were both  “enthralled by its content and style”.

By word of mouth, I’ve been told it’s “great” by one man, and that she “couldn’t put it down” by another reader. Several people who’ve finished this book have purchased subsequent volumes. It also seems to be finding favour at  local libraries.

Like all my collections of Short Stories, this is dominated by tales of love and romance, although several human interest stories  are interspersed. “Family Values”, about a child’s visit to see his grandparents who live in the country, and “New Digs”, relating a senior’s dilemma over moving home, have both been praised, but my feeling is that  “The Virgin Dancer” is by far the most moving. This very succinctly  tells the story of a middle-aged woman who has been held back in life, never able to live the “fuller, freer life” she wanted. Suddenly, circumstances contrive to find her at last on the dance floor, and able to be like everyone else, and dance.

“A Question of Trust”, which describes the scene where the rose-coloured glasses are abruptly removed from a rather naive young woman, and “Fresh Pickings”, the tale of young passion set against an ambitious family background, rank amongst the most striking love stories.

As in all my Short Story collections, the last story is  in fact a continuation of the first, with the elapse of many years.

If my review has whetted your appetite, why not check out this book on the Amazon web-site, and use the ‘click here’ feature? If you like what you read, please, spread the word!

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Ronald Sharp and ’60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences’

14 Oct

At every chance, my husband likes to Ron talk about our newest book, ’60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences’, which will shortly become available through Amazon.com.

Many readers of this blog will know that Ron is the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

While he speaks with enthusiasm by phone, it’s the in-person encounters which provide him with the best opportunity to show what we’ve done. That’s one indisputable virtue of having a proof copy!

Yesterday’s meeting with a friend provided the perfect opportunity, and, happily, he responded with equal excitement, interest and positivity.

Although the words and ideas in ’60 Questions….’ are mine, Ron has magically enhanced their presentation by his skillful, innovative editing; not to mention his attractively designed, unusual cover with compliments those of our ‘Life and Love’ series of modern, Australian Short Stories.

If you’re reading this, please spread the word!

Thanks!

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60 Questions, Insights and Reminiscences Published!

11 Oct

Today is THE DAY! The day that we break new ground, publishing our first non-Short Story book!

In a few days, Amazon.com will have it up for the world to see!

Do you love philosophical ideas, liberally laced with humourous insights? Yes?

Then this is for you!

With topics such as ‘What is Ambition?’, ‘What’s Good about Obscurity?’, ‘What’s Bad about Comedy?’, ‘What Makes a Musician?’, ‘Can you Live Without your Mobile?’, and ‘Can You Remember Cracker-night?’, you’ll find plenty of ideas to tick over.

In common with all my writing, this book is written in easy to understand language, and is, I feel, suitable for a anyone who likes lateral thinking, delivered with a smile.

Like all my books, it’s edited by my husband, Ronald Sharp B.E.M., the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

Remember my name: Margaret Lynette Sharp: and please, check out this boook, and tell your friends!

Thanks!

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Thanks, Amazon.com!

30 Sep

Congratulations to Amazon.com for their refreshingly slick delivery of web-sites for my brand new collection of modern Australian Short stories, ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’.

What a morale-boost!

With the four volumes completed, I’ve written a total of one hundred and six, easy to read short stories: mostly romances, sure, but all woven differently.  My favourites in ‘Reflections of Life and Love in Australia’ include ‘At The Art Society Picnic’, ‘Wishing’, ‘Letting Her Go’, and ‘Into the Sunshine’.

Not into Short Stories?  Then perhaps you’ll like my next book. Something quite different: yet, like the rest, edited by my husband  Ronald Sharp B.E.M., the creator of the Grand Organ in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House.

I’ll keep you posted!

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